Where does our supply of Natural Gas come from?

Traditionally, the majority of the supply of natural gas that has fueled New Brunswick homes, businesses, and public institutions came from Sable Island, Nova Scotia.

More recently, our customers receive natural gas from multiple North American sources, including the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (in Alberta, parts of Saskatchewan and British Columbia), Marcellus shale deposits (found throughout the Appalachian Basin from New York to Virginia and into eastern Ohio and western New York), and traditional US production fields. Other sources include LNG from the Canaport LNG terminal located in Saint John, New Brunswick (bringing natural gas from international sources like Trinidad & Tobago and Katar) and the local supply from McCully Field. 

When we purchase Enbridge Utility Gas supply for customers, we do so from two main sources: Empress, Alberta and Dawn, Ontario. Empress is located at the border of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Gas supplied here mainly comes from the Western Canadian Supply Basin. Dawn is located in southwestern Ontario near the Canada/United States border at Detroit, MI. Gas supplied here comes from multiple sources, including Marcellus, Western Canadian Supply Basin, and local historic production.

The natural gas is then transported through a series of transmission pipes to New Brunswick, to our distribution network.

Our customers are not dependent on local supply of natural gas today and any new supply into the system would not necessarily impact pricing in the short term, but we are supportive of local natural gas development done in an environmentally, safe and responsible manner that could lead to long term energy cost reductions for customers.

Regardless of the status of the local supply of natural gas, there continues to be many opportunities for natural gas supply throughout North America for our customers and we are always exploring options that would help lower our costs and keep rates low and stable. During the unprecedented highs in commodity pricing in 2014, for example, Enbridge was able to take steps to lock-in prices when appropriate in order reduce and mitigate price volatility for our customers.

For more information about Enbridge Utility Gas, click here!